Tag Archive: comic


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Professional bad guys are always scary.

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Turning up the tension, with a new bad guy in the room.

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What the *&%^ happens in Cape Town?
Why, fresh original movie scripts of course!
(Also had this idea that an AI might grow as a human does, and would therefore go through a petulant teenager stage…)

I’m convinced my graphic novel & film script is a winner, but perhaps the next hurdle to making it into a successful film, is connecting with the right investors. So in an effort to get more attention to the project, I’m trying some quite ‘tangential’ marketing. I’m going to post some cartoons – about 1 per week – that might hopefully bring more viewers either to this site, or to my Twitter account (here).

I’m thrilled my Twitter following has grown close to 500 in a couple of months, and it’s certainly led to interactions with some very interesting people in A.I. But perhaps some highly-shareable cartoons will grow that number higher?

Introducing ‘Robots of the Revolution’ – a wry look at life on Earth after the robots have taken over. There’re still be some humans trying to fit in, but mostly it will be A.I. robots taking on human roles. So, let’s see how it goes. Fun times!

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I’ll soon shift to talking more about filmmaking – since T.O.M. is my illustrated film script, and I’m hoping that it, plus my 2017 movie here will give possible investors enough confidence to invest in this exciting indie African Sci-Fi film project.

But first, these articles got my attention: An article highlighting how new ‘smart-locks’ can be opened remotely online. And this Wired story describes how traffic lights can be hacked! Who knew?

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Some more stories this week that show how fast things are moving now. This article about a new supercomputer also mentioned how OpenAI researchers showed that the amount of ‘compute’ used in A.I. between 2012 and 2018 doubled every 3.5 months, far exceeding Moore’s Law, which predicts a doubling every 18 months.

Meanwhile, this article suggests we’ll have bionic eyes within 5 years. The Oracle Machine only dared to predict digital lenses!

My graphic novel also talks about hackers being able to destroy computers remotely by ‘switching voltage on the processors’. Whilst I suspect most computers surely have defences against this, it seems Chinese researchers have found a loophole whereby hackers could at least set some smart chargers alight with a ‘BadPower attack’.
Warning – crazy times ahead.

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This article from India really got my attention. Quoting it: “The research further revealed that in questions where the CTRL has been asked “what happens to our soul after death,” the users preferred the answer given by the artificial intelligence (23.1%) over the one that is provided by Jesus Christ (20.3%). “

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Just like the research in the article, The Oracle Machine story bravely steps into the world of metaphysics, and rightly asks the important question: Could an A.I. Internet somehow become a type of religious inter-mediary for some, or more?

Whatever one feels about religion, no one can deny it’s played a huge role in humanity over at least the last few thousand years. We cannot now pretend it is not still a major and integral influence for a large part of humanity. And I don’t believe enough critical objective thinking is being done to try understand what it really means to us.

I prefer (my understanding of…) Jung’s interpretation, that religion can also be seen as sign-posts along our own evolution of consciousness. And I see an AI-enabled Internet as the likely next step along this development path.

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The fact that we now even have articles discussing the merits of chatbots versus human-operators is indicative of just how far we’ve come in the last few years!

Another interesting ‘chat’ development this month is OpenAI’s GPT3. OpenAI was founded by Musk and others in 2015 as a non-profit to ensure future superhuman AI is a benign force. Then in 2018 Musk left, and it became ‘for profit’, with $1Billion invested by Microsoft.

Now here’s the scary bit – OpenAI’s previous model, GPT2, was pulled because its ability to generate fake news, for example, was considered too dangerous. Yet GPT3 is far more powerful… Wired Magazine covers the story here.

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The bad guy in the book brandishes an untraceable 3D-printed ‘ghost’ gun. But how much of a threat are they really?

To build a 3D gun, you’d need the plans. I can imagine these are available somewhere on the dark web. (For reasons unclear to me, U.S.A President Trump has been trying to make such plans available online, but has been blocked by 20 states, who are suing over this issue.)

You’d also need a 3D printer and you’d need to know how to use it. And you’d still need the bullets.

3D printers are prohibitively expensive in South Africa. And not many people have the expertise to use them. It’s probably much easier to get a stolen gun. In the U.S.A., 3D printers are far more available, but perhaps so too are guns?

So for now, such printed guns are thankfully still out of reach for most criminals in South Africa. But I guess in time this will change.

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